cearta.ie

the Irish for rights

Privacy. The Lost Right

Cover of Mills' The title of this post is the provocative title of a recently published book from Oxford University Press written by Jon L Mills (on the author, see University of Florida Levin College of Law | University of Miami School of Law; on the book, see Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Google Books | OUP; if you want to judge it by its cover, that’s it on the right left).

The OUP blurb says that the book:

  • Provides a straightforward and concise history of the regulations and policies governing our personal privacy
  • Reviews the full range of privacy issues that affect United States citizens, including identity theft, government surveillance, tabloid journalism, and video surveillance in public places
  • Considers the legal tools available to individuals who wish to protect their personal privacy

The disturbing reality of contemporary life is that technology has laid bare the private facts of most people’s lives. Email, cell phone calls, and individual purchasing habits are no longer secret. Individuals may be discussed on a blog, victimized by an inaccurate credit report, or have their email read by an employer or government agency without their knowledge. Government policy, mass media, and modern technology pose new challenges to privacy rights, while the law struggles to keep up with the rapid changes.

Privacy: The Lost Right evaluates the status of citizens’ right to privacy in today’s intrusive world. Mills reviews the history of privacy protections, the general loss of privacy, and the inadequacy of current legal remedies, especially with respect to more recent privacy concerns, such as identity theft, government surveillance, tabloid journalism, and video surveillance in public places. Mills concludes that existing regulations do not adequately protect individual privacy, and he presents options for improving privacy protections.

This is only one of several recent books which make for compelling but depressing reading about the state of the protection of privacy today. Against that background, it was surely intended that the title have echoes of “Privacy: The Last Rite(s)”?

2 Responses to “Privacy. The Lost Right”

  1. Tipster says:

    if you want to judge it by its cover, that’s it on the right

    Umm, it’s actually on the left.

  2. Eoin says:

    Thanks, Tipster. I’ve amended accordingly.

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Welcome

Me in a hatHi there! Thanks for dropping by. I'm Eoin O'Dell, and this is my blog: Cearta.ie - the Irish for rights.

"Cearta" really is the Irish word for rights, so the title provides a good sense of the scope of this blog.

In general, I write here about private law, free speech, and cyber law; and, in particular, I write about Irish law and education policy.

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What I'd like for here is a simple widget that takes the list of feeds from my existing RSS reader and displays it here as a blogroll. Nothing fancy. I'd love a recommendation, if you have one.

I had built a blogroll here on my Google Reader RSS subscriptions. Google Reader produced a line of html for each RSS subscription category, each of which I pasted here. So I had a list of my subscriptions as my blogroll, organised by category, which updated whenever I edited Google Reader. Easy peasy. However, with the sad and unnecessary demise of that product, so also went this blogroll. Please take a moment to mourn Google Reader. If there's an RSS reader which provides a line of html for the list of subscriptions, or for each RSS subscription category as Google Reader did, I'd happily use that. So, as I've already begged, I'd love a recommendation, if you have one.

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Eoin.

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