Category: Conferences, Lectures, Papers and Workshops

The Future of the Law of Restitution for Unjust Enrichment in Ireland

Euro notes = Irish flag (notes via https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euro_banknotes)The Private Law Discussion Group in the School of Law, Trinity College Dublin, is delighted to welcome Dr Niamh Connolly (University College London) next Thursday, 30 March 2017, at 2:00pm, in the Trinity Research in Social Sciences (TRiSS) Seminar Room, 6th floor, Arts Building, TCD (map), to give a paper on


The Future of Restitution in Ireland.

All are welcome, particularly those with a research interest in private law, unjust enrichment and restitution. This event is open to the public and free of charge. If you would like to attend, please register on Eventbrite.

Niamh Connolly (via UCL website)Dr Niamh Connolly (pictured right) is a lecturer at University College London, where she moved from Trinity College Dublin in 2016. Her principal research and teaching interest is in unjust enrichment law. She is interested in how Irish private law compares to that of England and Wales, and in differences in legal culture that affect the substantive law in these jurisdictions. Her paper will seek to interpret the sparse Irish case law on unjust enrichment in light of this wider question about the specificity of Irish law. In particular, Niamh will ask whether Irish legal culture is less formalist than that of England and Wales, and if so, how that affects Irish restitution law. Niamh hopes that the seminar will provide an opportunity to hear the views of other Irish jurists as to the possible distinctiveness of Irish judicial approaches in private law.

The Private Law Discussion Group is a Research Group in the School of Law, Trinity College Dublin, which invites collaboration and engagement nationally and internationally on private law, including property law, tort, contract, restitution, and unjust enrichment.

The Right to be Forgotten – is it time to teach the world to sing in perfect harmony?

ISEL logo, via ISEL websiteThe Irish Society for European Law will hold an Update on Data Protection, next Thursday, 23 March 2017, at 6:30pm in the Ormond Meeting Rooms, 31-36 Ormond Quay Upper, Dublin 7.

The event will be chaired by the Hon Ms Justice Mary Finlay Geoghegan, Judge of the Court of Appeal; and the speakers will be Bruno Gencarelli (Head of the Data Flows & Protection Unit, DG Justice & Consumers, European Commission), Andreas Carney (Partner, Matheson), Emily Gibson BL (Law Library, Dublin), and me.

The event is open to all and is free of charge to ISEL members (there is a €30 charge for non-ISEL members, payable on arrival). Places are limited and will be allocated on a first come, first served basis. Please register for the event at www.isel.ie. 1.5 CPD points are available for this event.

Harmony, via Wikipedia (detail)The title of my talk is: The Right to be Forgotten – is it time to teach the world to sing in perfect harmony? I will consider whether delinking in support of the right to be forgotten [R2bF] ought to have worldwide effect. My talk will be in three brief parts. The first part will consider CJEU R2bF caselaw and member-state developments on the question whether an R2bF delinking derived from EU law should be effective worldwide or just inside the EU. Against this backdrop, the second part of the talk will argue that the Circuit Court decision Savage v Data Protection Commissioner & Google (Circuit Court, unreported, 11 October 2016, Sheahan J; pdf via DPC) mis-applied the R2bF. Third, combining the first and second parts, the final part of the talk will consider the proceedings in Google v Equustek Solutions (hearing 5 December 2016; webcast), in which the Supreme Court of Canada was invited to uphold an injunction (2015 BCCA 265) that an R2bF delinking derived from Canadian common law and constitutional considerations should be effective worldwide.

Implications of Brexit, North and South

Ire,UK,EuThe Irish Council for Civil Liberties (ICCL) seminar on the Constitutional and Human Rights Implications of BREXIT, North and South this evening at 5:00pm in the Distillery Building, Church Street, Dublin 7 (map via here). It’s something I’ve blogged about here, here, here and here. Since then, the UK Supreme Court has handed down its judgment in R (on the application of Miller) v Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union [2017] UKSC 5 (24 January 2017). I wrote an OpEd on the case in the Irish Times the following day. (more…)

Litigating against Mass Surveillance in the US

ACLUThere will be a public lecture by Ashley Gorski on

Litigating against Mass Surveillance in the US – The National Security Project at the American Civil Liberties Union

in the Swift Lecture Theatre, Room 2041A Arts Block, Trinity College Dublin (map here), next Friday 10 February 2017 from 6:00pm to 7:00pm. All are welcome to attend, and booking is not required.

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) was founded in 1920 to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed by the Constitution and laws of the United States. Whether it’s achieving full equality for LGBT people, establishing new privacy protections for our digital age of widespread government surveillance, ending mass incarceration, or preserving the right to vote or the right to have an abortion, the ACLU takes up the toughest civil liberties cases and issues to defend all people from government abuse and overreach.

The ACLU National Security Project advocates for national security policies that are consistent with the Constitution, the rule of law, and fundamental human rights. The project litigates cases relating to detention, torture, discrimination, surveillance, censorship, and secrecy. Originally created as an informal working group after the September 2001 attacks, the National Security Project is now at the forefront of virtually every major legal battle relating to national security, civil liberties, and human rights.

Ashley Gorski, via ACLUAshley Gorski (pictured, left) is a staff attorney at the National Security Project, where she works on issues related to post-9/11 racial and religious discrimination, torture, detention, and religious freedom. She is a graduate of Yale College and Harvard Law School. Prior to joining the ACLU, she worked at a New York law firm and served as a law clerk to the Hon Jon O. Newman, United States circuit judge for the Second Circuit Court of Appeals, and to the Hon Miriam Goldman Cedarbaum, United States district judge for the Southern District of New York. She is in Dublin to give evidence, about Mass Surveillance in the US, in the case currently before the High Court between the Data Protection Commissioner and Facebook, about current rules by which data is shared between the EU to the US.

The Origins of Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity

Sands PosterThere will be a public lecture by Professor Philippe Sands QC on

East West Street: A Personal Take on the Origins of Genocide & Crimes against Humanity

on Wednesday, 30 November 2016, at 7:30pm, in the Edmund Burke Lecture Theatre, Room 1008 Arts Building (map here), Trinity College, Dublin. All are welcome to attend.

Professor Philippe Sands QC is Professor of Law and Director of the Centre on International Courts and Tribunals at University College London, and a practising barrister at Matrix Chambers, London, specialising in international law.

His book East West Street: On the Origins of Genocide and Crimes against Humanity (Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2016 | Amazon) won the 2016 Baillie Gifford Prize for non-fiction. Robert Gerwath, reviewing it in the Irish Times, said that it was “a rare book” that “adds genuinely new insights into the war or its legacies”, and “succeeds in bringing the subject to life even for those not primarily interested in the evolution of legal concepts”. Sands has been involved in a number of high profile law cases and has published extensively. He contributes frequently to The Guardian, Financial Times, London Review of Books and Vanity Fair. His book East West Street formed the basis of the documentary film My Nazi Legacy: What our Fathers Did (2015 | imdb).

This lecture is part of the Sydney Gruson lecture series organised by the Herzog Centre in the Department of Near and Middle Eastern Studies, Trinity College Dublin, and the Holocaust Education Trust Ireland.

The Rule of Law and Asset-Grabbing (Reiderstvo) in Russia

Reiderstvo

There will be a public lecture on the Rule of Law and Asset-Grabbing (Reiderstvo) in Russia in the Neill Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin, on Tuesday 15 November 2016, at 3:00pm.

Booking is now open.



Reiderstvo Report coverReiderstvo (asset-grabbing) is the illicit acquisition of a business or part of a business in Russia. A recent report on The Rise of Reiderstvo: Implications for Russia and the West (pdf) by Dr Louise Shelley and Ms Judy Deane analyzes this corrosive phenomenon. The report will be presented by Prof Louise Shelley (George Mason University); there will be a reply by Prof Neil Robinson (University of Limerick); and there will be ample opportunity for questions and answers. The event will be haired by Dr Ann Power-Forde SC (former judge of the European Court of Human Rights).

The first comprehensive examination of its kind, the report on The Rise of Reiderstvo: Implications for Russia and the West analyzes the evolution of business raiding and asset grabbing in Russia. It identifies the methodical tools and tactics used by business raiders and provides concrete examples of heretofore unexamined cases inside Russia, documenting the “playbook” for systematizing asset grabbing.

Louise I ShelleyProf Louise Shelley is the Omer L and Nancy Hirst Endowed Chair and a University Professor at the Schar School of Policy and Government, George Mason University. She is the founder and Director of the Terrorism, Transnational Crime and Corruption Center (TraCCC) at George Mason University. Her latest book is Dirty Entanglements: Corruption, Crime and Terrorism (Cambridge University Press, 2014). She is at present an inaugural Andrew Carnegie Fellow and a Rockefeller Foundation Residence Fellow writing her current book on illicit trade and sustainability for Princeton University Press.

Neil RobinsonProf Neil Robinson is Professor of Comparative Politics at the University of Limerick. His research interests focus on Russian and post-communist politics, particularly the political economy of post-communism and post-communist state building. He is the author of Ideology and the Collapse of the Soviet System. A Critical History of Soviet Ideological Discourse (Aldershot and Brookfield, VT: Edward Elgar, 1995), and Russia: a state of uncertainty (London and New York: Routledge, 2002 (download))

Ann Power-FordeDr Anne Power-Forde SC was a judge on the European Court of Human Rights, Strasbourg from 2008 to 2014, and is now a member of the Bar of Ireland and of Doughty Street Chambers in London. On the ECHR, she was confronted with many of the most pressing concerns of our time – the legacy of the invasion of Iraq, the annexation of Crimea and other threats to European democracy, the consequences of global terrorism, the refugee crisis in the Mediterranean, the legacy of European genocide and the individual’s search for meaning and autonomy. She has lectured extensively on the Convention and has written on Judicial Ethics in the Court’s Handbook for Judges. She facilitates in judicial training seminars working with magistrates, prosecutors and advocates in the developing world. As an academic, she has over 20 years’ experience of lecturing in Philosophy and in Jurisprudence. In particular, she has developed a course reflecting upon fundamental human experiences and international human rights law which she teaches on a visiting basis at American and European Universities.

All are welcome to attend. Attendance is free, but booking (here, via eventbrite) is essential.

GradLink in TCD Law School

TCD logoHere in Trinity College Dublin, the GradLink Mentoring Programme aims to develop current students’ knowledge of the labour market and career paths, through nurturing career learning relationships with alumni mentors working in a range of career areas. The School of Law is participating in this year’s programme, connecting third year (Junior Sophister) students with graduates of the School who have kindly agreed to act as mentors, to pass on pass on knowledge and experience, and offer advice, guidance and information to our students on issues relating to their career and professional development. There are guidelines for mentors and students here (pdf). One past student said:

I very much enjoyed the GradLink Mentoring Programme as it gave me the chance to get advice from someone with experience in the field I wish to work in. It was invaluable to be able to take the time once a month to remove myself from thinking purely about college to think about my future and where I want to go. The wide range of advice my mentor gave me will definitely be helpful when I am looking for employment and the experience gave me confidence that people can find work in my area of qualification.

The School is privileged to have an excellent group of mentors who have carved out successful careers both in the legal profession (barristers, solicitors, in-house lawyers, government lawyers) and beyond (in business, media, government and so on). One past mentor said:

I really enjoyed participating in the GradLink programme. I was assigned three students, who were all fantastic and very engaged. It was great to be involved in this way with Trinity and nice to feel like I am giving back in some ways.

For this year’s students, there will be a launch event on Wednesday of next week, 12 October 2016, at 6:30pm in the Trinity Long Room Hub.. At the event, students will have the opportunity to meet mentors, who will briefly introduce themselves and their sector of employment, job role, or specialism. The deadline for interested students to register for a place is Monday of next week, 10 October 2016.

Reality and Illusion in EU Data Transfer Regulation post-Schrems

Crhis KunerOn the first anniversary of the judgment of the Court of Justice of the European Union in Case C-362/14 Schrems, Professor Christopher Kuner (pictured left), Professor of Law at the Vrije Universiteit Brussels, will give a public lecture on

Reality and Illusion in EU Data Transfer Regulation post-Schrems

The lecture will be held in the Neill Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin, on Thursday 6 October 2016, at 1:00pm.

In Case C-362/14 Schrems v Data Protection Commissioner [2015] ECR I-nyr (Grand Chamber, 6 October 2015), the Court of Justice of the European Union invalidated the EU-US Safe Harbour arrangement allowing personal data to be transferred to the US. The judgment is a landmark in the Court’s data protection case law, and illustrates the tension between the high level of legal protection for data transfers in EU law and the illusion of protection in practice. The judgment has undermined the logical consistency of the other legal bases for data transfer besides the Safe Harbour, and reactions to it have largely been based on formalism or data localization measures that are unlikely to provide real protection. Schrems also illustrates how many legal disagreements concerning data transfers are essentially political arguments in disguise. The EU and the US have since agreed on a replacement for the Safe Harbour (the EU-US Privacy Shield), the validity of which will likely be tested in the Court. It is crucial for data transfer regulation to go beyond formalistic measures and legal fictions, in order to move regulation of data transfers in EU law from illusion to reality.

Professor Christopher Kuner is a leading expert on the law of data protection and, in particular, the law governing the international transfer of data. He is Professor of Law and Co-Chairman of the Brussels Privacy Research Hub at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel and Senior Privacy Counsel in the Brussels office of Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati. He is also a Visiting Professor in the Department of Law in the London School of Economics and Political Science, an associate professor in the Law Faculty of the University of Copenhagen and an affiliated lecturer and Honorary Fellow of the Centre for European Legal Studies of the University of Cambridge. He is the author of Transborder Data Flows and Data Privacy Law (OUP, 2013) and Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of International Data Privacy Law (also published by OUP).

ADAPT centre logoAttendance is free, and all are welcome to attend, but booking is essential, so please register at eventbrite.

The lecture is organised by the Ethics & Privacy Working Group of the ADAPT Centre, TCD, in conjunction with the Trinity Long Room Hub, TCD School of Law, TCD School of Religions, Peace Studies and Theology, TCD Library and DCU Institute of Ethics.